How The Great Resignation Helps Military Spouses Thrive

Military members and their families are stationed across the globe and are often asked to relocate to new assignments. Remote working and flexible scheduling are making it easier for military spouses to find and keep jobs.

Hiring new employees is a time-consuming and costly process.

And for years, hiring a worker who has a spouse in the military has been a risky proposition for companies, according to Jacey Eckhart, a career coach for Military.com.

Military members and their families are typically asked to move every 2½ years and employers know that, said Eckhart.

But things have changed.

Many employers are offering remote options and flexible schedules to attract talent.

And many military job seekers want to have long-term opportunities. A recent Military.com survey found that over half of military job seekers, which includes spouses, prefer to work at a job where they can stay for more than five years, said Eckhart.

Check out this video to learn more about how military members, veterans and their spouses are benefiting from the new job market.

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How The Great Resignation Helps Military Spouses Thrive

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